.

THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CALIFORNIA - This site is dedicated to exposing the continuing Marxist Revolution in California and the all around massive stupidity of Socialists, Luddites, Communists, Fellow Travelers and of Liberalism in all of its ugly forms.


"It was a splendid population - for all the slow, sleepy, sluggish-brained sloths stayed at home - you never find that sort of people among pioneers - you cannot build pioneers out of that sort of material. It was that population that gave to California a name for getting up astounding enterprises and rushing them through with a magnificent dash and daring and a recklessness of cost or consequences, which she bears unto this day - and when she projects a new surprise the grave world smiles as usual and says, "Well, that is California all over."

- - - - Mark Twain (Roughing It)

Thursday, May 28, 2015

Sex Goggles must be worn says Democrat run agency


Protective sex gear as designed by government drone workers.

More Jobs to Leave California
Why would a business stay in California when they 
can move to Nevada or Mexico? 


LOS ANGELES — Adult film performers in California could soon be required to wear condoms and goggles to prevent exposure to bodily fluids, and producers would have to pay for medical visits and Hepatitis B treatments, under a new set of safety procedures recently released by the state Occupational Safety and Health Standards Board (Cal/OSHA).

The 21-page proposal, released by the Board on Thursday, outlines new standards for ensuring that porn performers remain safe from sexually transmitted diseases and bloodborne pathogens.
The proposal would require producers to provide condoms and other “barrier protection,” like protective eye gear, to adult film stars.
But the porn industry and its supporters say the new regulations go too far.
“These are regulations designed for medical settings, and are unworkable on an adult film set – or even a Hollywood film set,” Free Speech Coalition CEO Diane Duke said in a statement. “We’ve come to San Diego with ways to amend the regulations, with input from both performers and public health officials, in ways that protect adult film performers without stigmatizing and shutting down an entire industry.”
According to the Los Angeles Daily News, the new regulations are the result of a campaign by the AIDS Healthcare Foundation to ensure safety on adult film sets. In 2009, AHF President Michael Weinstein wrote a letter to Cal/OSHA complaining that California porn production companies were refusing to provide condoms on all adult film sets in California, elevating the risk of disease transmission. To underscore his point, Weinstein mailed 60 DVDs of California-shot porn films that did not use condoms to the regulatory agency along with the letter.
In 2012, AHF and Weinstein were instrumental in the passage of Measure B, regulation that requires condom use on all adult films shot in Los Angeles County. Efforts to pass a statewide condom law failed in an Assembly committee last year, but the organization is already working on measure to be placed on the 2016 ballot.
Illegal Sex
Sex goggles are not being worn by the actors, and there are no government
drone workers in the studio to monitor the movie production.

Five years after he mailed his letter, Weinstein told the Daily News he is “pleased” with the agency’s proposal.
“Getting to this point is a necessary part of the process, and we’re pleased that this has been completed,” he told the paper. “The process is designed to give everybody a say. I think it was conducted fairly.”
But porn industry executives and performers say existing regulations are already adequate to ensure performer safety. Actors and actresses are already required to be tested for STDs every 14 days, and are not allowed to work until receiving a clear report.
“There is already a code of honor between performers [to get tested], because you could kill someone,” actress Anya Ivy told Breitbart News at the Adult Entertainment Expo in Las Vegas earlier this year.
Still others say that increasingly tough regulations in California could force the estimated $7-13 billion adult film industry out of California and into states like Nevada and Florida, where safety standards are more relaxed.
“From a sustainability standpoint, the industry has to move to Las Vegas,” PornCareerBuilder.com’s Michael Wondercub told Breitbart News. “In general, California has higher taxes and a higher cost of living… This is a safe industry if you play by the rules and Nevada just has less regulations.”
Read More . . . .

Democrat Sex




.
Democrat Party Condom Police
Democrat run California will send condom inspectors to the sets of porn movie shoots to make sure the condoms are properly installed and snug with no leakage. Moron Democrats want to get a firm grip on both our wallets and deployed condoms.

No, beer goggle do not qualify under
State of California rules.

Tuesday, May 26, 2015

Supreme Court could take away 6 California congressional seats



Scum and Villainy
Six less jerks going to a nest of corruption.  
I'm trying to see the downside.


(Los Angeles Times)  -  The U.S. Supreme Court's agreement Tuesday to hear a case that could potentially overhaul how political districts are drawn has sparked waves of speculation among political and legal wonks -- including questions as to how a ruling could affect California's clout in Congress.

The case, which the court will hear this fall and rule on next year, centers on the "one person, one vote" principle that has long guided how political districts are drawn. Currently, districts are drawn to be of roughly equal size based on total population. But a Texas conservative group wants those lines to be drawn based on citizens who can vote.

Although the case pertains to state and local districts, experts say the justices could issue a ruling broad enough to also affect congressional lines, as well as the number of representatives each state sends to the House of Representatives.

Congressional seats are apportioned every 10 years, based on the census. States with large noncitizen populations -- such as California -- may be assigned fewer seats if only eligible voters are considered.

If the court's ruling affected reapportionment, "California would be the biggest loser," said Paul Mitchell, vice president of consulting firm Political Data Inc.

Mitchell estimated that California would lose six congressional seats, dropping to 47 seats from 53. Texas, which also has large numbers of people living in the country illegally, would face the second-largest drop,  going to 32 seats from 36.

"The average size of a congressional district would go from the current 710,000 to approximately 500,000 per seat," Mitchell said. 

Read More . . . .



Saturday, May 23, 2015

Grand jury probes PG&E's ties with California regulators


Erin Brockovich
Erin was involved with the PG&E case about contamination of drinking water with hexavalent chromium in the southern California town of Hinkley.  The case was settled in 1996 for $333 million, the largest settlement ever paid in a direct-action lawsuit in US history. 

Corruption in PG&E - Say it ain't so

  • Only a "crazy" person would think that a government granted monopoly that is in bed with movers and shakers could possibly be corrupt.


SAN FRANCISCO -- A federal grand jury is investigating ties between executives with California's largest utility and state regulators, a newspaper reported Friday.
The San Francisco Chronicle said it's the latest probe involving relations between Pacific Gas and Electric Co. and regulators with the California Public Utilities Commission since a PG&E pipeline explosion in 2010 killed eight people in suburban San Francisco.

A federal investigation after the blast concluded that lax oversight by the utilities commission was partly to blame.

Federal investigations last year charged the utility with violating safety laws and obstructing justice in connection with the pipeline blast. In April, the panel approved a record $1.6 billion penalty against PG&E in connection with the disaster.

The explosion prompted state and federal investigations into allegations of back-channel dealings between PG&E executives and the utility commission's former head, Michael Peevey, whose term expired earlier this year. Peevey has not commented publicly on the probes.

PG&E officials say company officials involved in the relations with regulators no longer work for the utility.


In the letter disclosing the grand jury investigation, two assistant U.S. attorneys told PG&E lawyers that they plan to use some of the evidence from the probe in the prosecution of the San Bruno case against the company. They did not provide further details.
PG&E spokesman Greg Snapper told the Chronicle in a statement: "We've publicly reported that state and federal attorneys have begun investigations in connection with these communications. We're going to keep cooperating with officials as the process moves forward."

(San Jose Mercury News)


PG&E Suggested “Prozac” for Injured

New e-mails brought to light between Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E), Southern California Edison (SCE), and the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) reveal the extent of corruption and backroom dealing that have characterized the state’s smart meter program.  

E-mails reveal that former CPUC President Michael Peevey was aware of health problems caused by smart meters early on in the program.   Commissioners and staff experienced overcharging and electronic interference issues with smart meters on their homes.  Meanwhile, utilities schemed with regulators behind the scenes to raise opt-out fees to force people in poverty to stick with the unpopular meters and prop up the failing multi-billion dollar smart grid program in California.
Read more:  Scoop Feed.net

Wednesday, May 20, 2015

Two Democrats in State Senate election - Guess which party won?



"Corruptus in Extremis"

  • Yet another phony and corrupt California election.  Some 57% of the voters in the San Francisco Bay Area district below are not Democrats, but the voters were force-fed a phony "choice" of two special interest funded Democrats on their ballot.


(Los Angeles Times)  -  In a battle between two Democrats, Orinda Mayor Steve Glazer was elected Tuesday to the state Senate in a special election over Assemblywoman Susan Bonilla of Concord for a seat representing the East Bay.

With 100% of precincts reporting, Glazer had 54.6% of the vote, compared with the 45.4% garnered by Bonilla.

"Our campaign struck a chord with voters frustrated by the gridlock and dysfunction in Sacramento," Glazer said when the results were in. "They want leaders who are more pragmatic than partisan, more focused on answers than ambition."

The contest proved one of the most expensive and acrimonious legislative battles in recent years, with more than $7 million spent by outside groups, in addition to the $2 million spent by the candidates themselves.

Glazer, a moderate Democrat and longtime political advisor to Gov. Jerry Brown, received outside help from the California Chamber of Commerce, while unions spent heavily for Bonilla. Glazer had angered labor by opposing strikes by public transit employees of BART, while Bonilla supports their right to strike.

The California Democratic Party had backed Bonilla. The party's executive director, Shawnda Westly, said Tuesday the party would not back down from  supporting candidates like Bonilla in the future.

"Her opponent claimed to be Democrat but ran a cynical campaign to appeal to Republican voters in a low-turnout election," Westly said in a statement. "We know that low-turnout elections favor Republicans. When Democratic voters show up and vote, Democrats win." 

The special election was held to fill a vacancy in the Senate created when Mark DeSaulnier was elected to Congress.

Read More . . . .




Back When Free Elections Existed
In the olden days when legislative districts were small just about anyone could afford to run for and win political office.  A candidate might spring for a few kegs of beer for the audience and then jump on a tree stump and give a speech.  The more or less sober voters would then select the candidate that supported their views.
.
State Senate districts in neighboring Nevada have only 133,000 people. Today California State Senate districts have nearly 1,000,000 people making it insanely expensive to run for office.  So in California only millionaires or those willing to be bribed with campaign cash by Billionaire Special Interest Cartels win elections.
.
California voters are only allowed a "choice" between two bought and paid for special interest funded candidates.  It is rule by oligarchy.
.
The answer is much smaller state legislative districts and a part time legislature that meets for 90 days and the legislators are forced to return home to work for a living like the rest of us do.

Tuesday, May 19, 2015

Calif. loses another major corporation to Texas



Toyota and Kubota Flee to Texas


From Eric Dondero: 

A year ago former Texas Governor Rick Perry gleamed from ear-to-ear when he announced that California-based Toyota, headquartered in Torrance, was shifting its entire corporate operations to the Dallas suburb of Grapevine. 

Now this, from the DailyBreeze.com, "Tractor manufacturer Kubota follows Toyota out of Torrance to Texas, taking with it 180 jobs":


Torrance will lose 180 jobs when tractor manufacturer Kubota and its credit arm, a fixture in Southern California for 43 years, becomes the latest Japanese-owned subsidiary to leave the South Bay and move its American headquarters to Texas, the company announced Thursday. 
Much like Toyota, which made a similar announcement last year, Kubota Tractor Corp. and Kubota Credit Corp. are relocating to the Dallas suburb of Grapevine within the next 18 months. Company officials said the move will allow its administrative staff to be closer to its major markets and manufacturing, assembly and distribution facilities in Georgia and Kansas.

Editor's comment - Torrance mayor Pat Furray, a Democrat, has gotta be like the most unluckiest sap in all of California. 

Oh, and yes, we do know that's not a Kubota in the re-done YouTube video of the monster Kenny Chensney hit "She thinks my tractor's sexy." But it could be?



Thanks to The Libertarian Republican.net


Kenny Chesney- She Thinks My Tractor's Sexy





Kubota Tractor Corporation and Kubota Credit Corporation announced today that they will relocate their headquarters to Grapevine, Texas. The company is currently based in Torrance. (Chuck Bennett / Staff Photographer) 

Sunday, May 17, 2015

Palmdale officials settle lawsuit, agree to voting by district


Palmdale City Councilman Fred Thompson
Thompson was elected to the Palmdale School Board and subsequently
appointed to the City of Palmdale Planning Commission.

Racism - The Wrong Race 
is on the City Council

  • Latino "activists" somehow managed to find three "discriminated against" residents willing to put their names on a multi-million dollar racism lawsuit and share in the settlement.
  • The fact that an African American is on the city council means nothing to so-called Latino "activists".  He is a member of the wrong race.  So who are the real racists?


(Los Angeles Times)  -  Palmdale officials Wednesday night announced that they have agreed to major changes in their elections system, settling a widely watched lawsuit over minority representation and the California Voting Rights Act.

Until now, Palmdale was a lone holdout in a string of lawsuits filed against cities that resisted district voting, which backers say helps minority groups gain elected office.

The city agreed to align its balloting to coincide with state and federal general elections, starting in November 2016. It also agreed to have voters choose elected officials by four geographic districts, including two with Latino majorities, rather than from the city as a whole.

Palmdale also will pay $4.5 million plus interest to lawyers (editor - follow the money!!!) for the three minority plaintiffs who argued that the city's at-large voting system deprived them of opportunities to elect representatives of their choice.

The current City Council members will continue to serve until the next election, when the balloting for mayor — elected at large every two years — also will be held. Council terms can be staggered after that, according to the agreement.

The settlement represents the end of a three-year court battle and a major victory for voting rights activists.

Most cities, school districts and other jurisdictions targeted under the state's voting rights law have switched rather than wage costly court battles. Santa Barbara and Whittier are among the most recent cities to agree to change from at-large to by-district elections.

Jurisdictions vulnerable to lawsuits under the act generally have significant minority populations but few or no minority elected officials. In Palmdale, minorities make up almost 75% of the population, but candidates of color rarely have won a seat on the City Council.

Councilman Fred Thompson, an African American, said his 2013 election proved the lawsuit was “both unnecessary and disingenuous.”

Mayor Pro Tem Mike Dispensa called on the state Legislature to make changes in the voting rights law.

“This lawsuit has never been about race or voting rights,” Mayor Jim Ledford said, adding it “always has been about money and politics.” Ledford produced a list of 25 voting rights cases across California that he said have cost taxpayers more than $13.8 million.

Read More . . . .


Palmdale is in the northern Mojave Desert of Los Angeles County. 

Thursday, May 14, 2015

Obamacare California slashes spending



You Mean it's NOT free?


(Los Angeles Times)  -  After using most of $1 billion in federal start-up money, California's Obamacare exchange is preparing to go on a diet.

That financial reality is reflected in Covered California's proposed budget, to be released Wednesday, as well as a reduced forecast calling for 2016 enrollment of fewer than 1.5 million people.

The recalibration comes after tepid enrollment growth for California during the second year of the Affordable Care Act. The state ended open enrollment in February with 1.4 million people signed up, far short of its goal of 1.7 million.

Covered California can't draw on the state general funds, and its primary source of revenue is a $13.95 monthly fee tacked onto every individual policy sold.

"This budget marks a turning point for Covered California of moving from a start-up with federal support to demonstrating we can operate under our own steam for years to come," said Peter Lee, Covered California's executive director.

The budget details include proposals to:

  • Spend $58 million less compared with the current fiscal year, a 15% reduction.
  • Devote the largest portion, $121.5 million, to outreach, sales and marketing. That's down 33% from the current year.
  • Maintain the monthly $13.95 fee for each individual policyholder, which would raise $233.2 million in revenue.
  • The state also would draw on $100 million in federal money in reserves — the last of the start-up grant. No further federal funding is expected.

"Holding fees flat like they did is an important safeguard for the affordability of Covered California coverage," said Nicole Evans, a spokeswoman for the California Assn. of Health Plans.

"As the myriad of interest groups pressure the board to fund their projects, they need to stand firm in protecting premium prices and holding down the budget," she said.

Read More . . . .





Tuesday, May 12, 2015

Democrats to Remove “Alien” from Illegal Alien



Politically Correct Masturbation

  • Democrat whore politicians get a sexual thrill every time they screw over an American and pander to the citizens of foreign nations.


(The Guardian)  -  The California State Senate approved a bill to remove the term “alien” from the California Labor Code on May 1. Sen. Tony Mendoza (D-Artesia), chair of the Senate Labor and Industrial Relations Committee, introduced SB 432 this past February. 
Currently, the term “alien” is used to refer to “any person not a citizen or national of the United States,” according to the Legal Information Institute of Cornell University Law School. The term “alien” has a long history in the U.S. and has been included in laws, such as the Alien and Sedition Acts in 1798, which granted the early U.S. government the power to deport foreigners deemed dangerous to the country. Furthermore, the terms “illegal alien” and “unauthorized alien” are frequently used in U.S. laws and statutes.
Mendoza feels that the term holds a negative connotation and should no longer be used.
“The time has come for California to remove the term ‘alien’ from the state’s Labor Code,” Mendoza said in a press conference. “Alien is now commonly considered a derogatory term for a foreign-born person and has very negative connotations. SB 432 will modernize the Labor Code and removes the term ‘alien’ to describe a person who is not born in or a fully naturalized citizen of the United States.”
Mendoza added that the term “alien” can become problematic in the hiring process and troublesome for new immigrants looking for jobs.
“The word ‘alien’ and any law prescribing an order for the issuance of employment to ‘aliens,’ have no place in the laws of our state and, more importantly, should never be the basis of an employment hiring,” Mendoza said. “SB 432 will delete this outdated, discriminatory and unnecessary reference in state law.”
Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor also finds the term “alien” offensive.
“To call them illegal aliens seemed and does seem insulting to me,” Sotomayor said in a speech about immigration at Yale Law School.
Read More . . . .


Neither the open borders Democrats or Republicans give a damn about protecting the jobs of American citizens.  Democrats want future voters and Republicans want cheap labor. 

Sunday, May 10, 2015

The Democrat soda tax returns



Re-Distributing Your Wealth
"Right after liberal Democrats, the most dangerous 
politicians are country club Republicans."


(Sacramento Business Journal)  -  Distributors of soda and other sugary drinks would be required to pay two pennies per ounce for diabetes programs under legislation by a Santa Monica Democrat.
As have previous incarnations of the bill, it pits health organizations against business groups. These include the California Chamber of Commerce, which has labeled the bill a job killer, and the California Restaurant Association, which calls it government overreach.
The bill’s author, Democrat Assemblyman Richard Bloom, highlights studies that show taxes on sweetened beverages lower consumption. 
In January 2014, the Mexican government slapped a tax on sodas. The action led to a 10 percent reduction of purchases, according a study from Bloomberg Philanthropies and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.
A one-cent per ounce tax proposed in 2013 was estimated to bring in $1.8 billion to the state, but died in committee. A similar bill met the same fate in 2010. And legislation last year that would have required a warning label on soda akin to cigarettes died last year in committee.
Assembly Bill 1357 will be heard May 12 in an Assembly health committee.
Read More . . . .





Friday, May 8, 2015

Satellites Monitor California’s Sinking Central Valley



The Political Hacks are Clueless

  • The drought threatens the entire economy of California. But the moronic bipartisan political hacks in Sacramento still have done nothing about building a string of desalination plants up and down the coast.
  • Meanwhile. countless billions (billions with a "B") are pissed down a corrupt rat hole to build a "bullet" train to nowhere. 


(Wired Magazine)  -  CALIFORNIA IS RUNNING on groundwater right now. As the state has cut down on surface water deliveries from rivers and reservoirs, farmers and municipal water suppliers have reacted by sucking more and more out of Madre Earth. The state’s land, in response, is sinking lower and lower, day by day, year by year.

In times of crisis, turning to groundwater is understandable (it may even be unavoidable). But—as it stares down its inevitably dessicated future—California is finally waking up to the need to monitor and protect these reserves. To do that, the state’s Department of Water Resources is turning to new techniques using satellite data which, by measuring changes in the ground above, can keep an eye on water levels below. Essentially, if the Golden State is going to weather this disaster, it will need some help from up high.

Earlier this week Tom Farr, a geologist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California, completed the first of many maps for the California Department of Water Resources with data collected by the European Sentinel-1 satellite. That map, of the state’s agriculture hub in the Central Valley, is part of a larger project to use NASA expertise to study—and try to help combat—California’s drought.


Subsidence in California's Central Valley

This animation shows, in exaggerated terms, how the surface of the southern Central Valley of California deformed from the period 2007 to 2011. Interferometric data from the Japanese ALOS PALSAR imaging radar was used to measure the deformation, shown in color overlaid on an ASTER image. The large subsidence "bowl" that developed over this time period was caused by withdrawal of groundwater, causing subsurface layers to compact. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar, or InSAR, can be used to monitor subsidence in order to prevent groundwater overdraft and irreversible compaction of aquifers. ALOS PALSAR data is copyright JAXA/METI and was provided by the GEO Supersites and the U.S. Government Research Consortium datapool at the Alaska Satellite Facility.




One of the ways California will use Farr’s maps is to identify groundwater trouble spots (the faster the land is sinking, the faster the water is being depleted). A new law signed last year by Governor Brown requires regional water agencies to devise groundwater sustainability plans. To do that, though, they’ll need good data. And, at the moment, good groundwater information is hard to find and expensive to gather.
The state can monitor groundwater directly by measuring water levels within wells—but digging new wells is expensive, and existing wells may be on private land. “The other problem,” Farr says, “is that you’re not sure what kind of aquifer they’re drilled into.” Aquifers can be confined, separated from the surface by an impermeable layer of dirt or rock, or unconfined, with water entering from the ground directly above. 
Well data can be hard to interpret as most wells penetrate more than one level in the aquifer system. So, not only is the water-level in the well hard to interpret in terms of groundwater volume, explains Farr, but they provide portals for water to move between different parts of the aquifer system—altering the very thing geologists seek to measure.
Read More . . . .



Overpumping Water in a Desert
In 1892 (above) Tulare Lake was once the biggest 
freshwater lake west of the Mississippi.​

What remains of Tulare Lake today after endless
overpumping of ground water in order to grow crops,
build cities and golf courses in a desert.

That sinking feeling
The sign reads, " San Joaquin Valley California Subsidence, 3M 1925 - 1977."  The Central Valley has been sinking from over pumping for a century.

(Water California.org)